Whoever closes his eyes to the past is blind to the present.
Richard von Weizsäcker

Since we also deal with DNA analyzes for the purpose of ancestral research since 2017, we would like to present the results here. We publish the paternal and maternal lineage analyzes as well as links to the accessible pedigrees. Who has relevant matches with us is welcome to contact us

Testkits at Gedmatch genesis (Analyzes were done at Living DNA and MH)

Hardy Eberle - TL6464461 → Living DNA Results

Comparisons are also possible here belowFamily Tree or List of Ancestors

or

visible family trees at Ancestry [free basic membership]

I also did a DNA test at ancestry - family tree Ancestry for viewing

Here are the ancestors Hardy Eberle (family treer). Mainly recorded are the direct ancestors and their children as well as some secondary lines. More connections over secondary lines can be found in the large database (approx. 11,300 linked persons)

Complete family tree at Geneanet

Family Tree Schweiker / Eberle (nicht aktuell)

You can see here the direct ancestors of Hardy Eberle and his wife with children, no further descendants. [Number of persons: 7.337 - Last update from 20/11/2012]

 

Source analysis maternal page

Haplogroup: J1c
Subclade: J1c7a

J1c was born around 16,500 years ago, likely in the eastern Mediterranean.

Eve e

Your motherline signature belongs to the J1c group.

This haplogroup arose in a woman approximately 16,500 years ago. Although not crystal clear, it is thought that your motherline first arose in the eastern Mediterranean and parts of the southern Balkans during the end of the Ice Age. Migrations may have been limited at this time by the harsh climate. It is thought that the carriers of your haplogroup largely stayed close to the location of origin until the Neolithic (New Stone Age). By this time, the populations carrying J1c began to spread out across the rest of Europe (Hay, 2016). The maternal line J1c has been associated with the paternal line E-V13 and J2b. It is possible that the groups intermingled during the Neolithic expansions.

Today, J1c is found across much of Europe and in low frequencies across the Near East. It is most common in Slovenia, Ukraine, Hungary and Greece. It is not found anywhere in extremely high frequencies, but is detectable across a vast radius throughout Europe.

Who were the people who carried your signature?

Your motherline first arose in a woman who lived during the Ice Age. As haplogroup J1c arose around 16,500 years ago, this was before the vast expanse of ice began to melt (Olivieri et al., 2013). Not long after this time, the ice began to withdraw, ultimately revealing a warmer, wetter and more habitable landscape. However, the earliest carriers of your motherline would have endured very harsh conditions during this time. They would have been hardy hunter gatherers, whose diet consisted of the meat they hunted and nuts and plants they foraged. Competition for resources such as food and shelter would have been fierce, which in collaboration with the freezing climate meant that these nomads had to be resilient and hardy.  As J1c likely originated in the eastern Mediterranean and southern Balkans, carriers of your motherline may have taken refuge in this more temperate location.

J1c has been discovered in the remains of Neolithic farmers as far as Anatolia (Mathieson et al., 2015). This provides evidence for migrations of J1c outside of Europe, and shows the connection of your motherline to the spread of agriculture. The Neolithic Era marked a change in humanity's way of life indefinitely. Farming not only signified a new dietary pattern, but formed the foundation to support more people on less land. People no longer had to solely forage and hunt to survive.

The maternal haplogroup is a collection of related family lines associated with its mtDNA. It is a direct female line that can be traced along its entire lineage. You share a common ancestor with all the people who share this haplogroup.

Haplogroups can be associated with geographic regions and are also used to track the ancient migrations of early humans.

This map shows where this haplogroup is most commonly found. It is important to note that maps are used here with modern nation states, as we are most familiar with, but there will be overlaps in the surrounding areas as they are politically created borders.

Mutterlinie e

Source analysis paternal page

Haplogroup: R-P312

Adam e

Our analysis gives your haplogroup as R-P312. Your earliest ancestors reached Britain and Ireland around 2500BC. Geneticists can tell that there was a very rapid expansion of population because P312 immediately divides into many subgroups, a sign that many sons of each man were living, as were the grandsons of these men. Lineages were multiplying as people multiplied and spread. The rate of fertility was exponential and your P312 markers expanded in every direction.

Along with skills making particularly fine style of decorated pottery they were also skilled goldsmiths. It appears that they could extract copper from ore and work it. This was probably seen as a magical process; the use of fire to change dull ore into bright and shiny objects such as jewelry and weaponry.

Who were the people who carried your signature?

Farming was already important but your ancestors probably derived their tremendous prestige and power from their other skills.

Their decorated beakers have occasionally been found to contain the residue of beer and there is some evidence that the cultivation of barley increased after c2,500BC. However was more likely that their abilities as metalworkers powered their expansion. Copper is a comparatively soft metal but it could still be fashioned into fearsome weaponry. Axe-like halberds have been found. It may well be that the dominance of R1b lineages in general and R-P312 in particular came about because of an aggressive takeover of land. Your P312 marker, continued to cross the North Sea with early medieval invaders such as the Jutes, Angles, Frisians, Saxons and Norse Vikings, as well as German auxiliaries that came with the Roman legions.

The paternal haplogroup is a collection of related family lines linked to the YDNA. It is a direct male line that can be traced along its entire lineage. You share a common ancestor with all the people who share this haplogroup.

Haplogroups can be associated with geographic regions and can also be used to track the ancient migrations of early humans.

This map shows where this haplogroup is most commonly found. It is important to note that maps are used here with modern nation states, as we are most familiar with, but there will be overlaps in the surrounding areas as they are politically created borders.

Vaterlinie e

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